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AST Advocacy

The AST Public Policy Committee is a leading voice on Capitol Hill, within the Executive Branch, and in State Capitols on important issues impacting the field of solid organ transplantation. Members of the Society’s Public Policy Committee regularly travel to Washington, DC, to educate and deliver the organization’s public policy agenda directly to key federal decision-makers and their staff. AST also maintains a full-time advocacy office in the nation’s capitol.

In the past, AST leaders have been called upon to provide testimony, as well as serve on advisory panels to Congress, State legislatures, the National Institutes of Health, Institutes of Medicine, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, the Office of the Secretary-Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control, etc.

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AST EMPLOYEE LEAVE & ORGAN DONATION PROGRAM

Public and private employers across the U.S. are implementing programs that make it easier for their employees to donate their organs to loved ones. Visit the links below to learn about Employee Leave and Organ Donation Programs and to view conversations with organ donors whose decision to give the gift-of-life were assisted by employers whose programs and policies facilitated the process.

There are a number of tools below for your use when meeting with your human resources professional and obtaining their participation in the program.

PUBLIC POLICY TOOL KIT

AST now has "live" companion bills in the US House of Representatives and the US Senate seeking to extend immunosuppressive drug coverage for kidney transplant patients.

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KEY POSITION STATEMENTS

Transplantation is a rapidly advancing field; it is important to provide accurate information to federal decision makers and their staff. Therefore, the AST Pulic Policy Committee developed key position statements that address these important issues.

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AST PHS GUIDELINE COMMENTS

PHS Guideline for reducing transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) through organ transplantation.