Education

Timely Topics in Transplantation Webinar Series

February 16, 2016

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Speaker: Matt Cooper, MD • Medstar Georgetown Transplant Institute
Moderator: Harini Chakkera, MD • Mayo Clinic Hospital

After participating in this webinar, the learner will be able to:

  1. Define the components of a successful living donor kidney program to evaluate an efficient number of FTE’s and assistant personnel as well as developing and cultivating a culture within that personnel to best support living donors, their support staff, and their needs.
  2. Appraise the current resource allocation of their current living donor program and analyze where investments might be best undertaken to begin process improvements.
  3. Evaluate current living donor program metrics beyond number of potential donors and number of organs transplanted to work towards a more critical evaluation of measuring success in personnel activities as well as patient safety and program quality.

 

December 18, 2013

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

What You'll Learn:

  1. Identify risk factors for non-adherence and tools to measure non-adherence
  2. Evaluate the traditional methods used to improve/monitor medication adherence
  3. Review today's mobile adherence technologies for improving/monitoring medication adherence
  4. Summarize tomorrow's technologies for improving/monitoring medication adherence

What You'll Learn:

  • Identify risk factors for non-adherence and tools to measure non-adherence
  • Evaluate the traditional methods used to improve/monitor medication adherence
  • Review today's mobile adherence technologies for improving/monitoring medication adherence
  • Summarize tomorrow's technologies for improving/monitoring medication adherence
May 20, 2015

Kimberly Brown, MD • Henry Ford Hospital
Tiffany Kaiser, PharmD • University of Cincinnati
Moderated by Josh Levitsky, MD • Northwestern Memorial Hospital

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

This webinar is designed to focus on emerging therapies for HCV in transplant patients with specific attention to drug-drug interactions and limitations in patients with renal disease.

After participating in this webinar, the learner will be able to:

  1. Define current strategies for HCV treatment in the post transplant recipient
  2. Describe the limitations of current drug therapy in patients with renal disease
  3. Explain relevant drug-drug interactions of antiviral therapies with transplant medications

This webinar is designed to focus on emerging therapies for HCV in transplant patients with specific attention to drug-drug interactions and limitations in patients with renal disease.


Objectives:

  • Define current strategies for HCV treatment in the post transplant recipient
  • Describe the limitations of current drug therapy in patients with renal disease
  • Explain relevant drug-drug interactions of antiviral therapies with transplant medications
November 20, 2013

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

Were you unable to attend the IPITA World Congress in September or need a review of talks you might have missed? If so, attend this webinar for a meeting review, and get caught up on all of the highlights you need to know!

Dr. Peter Stock, IPITA 2013 Congress Chair, will provide a meeting summary highlighting the marked improvements in rates of insulin independence following both pancreastic islet and whole organ pancreas transplants for diabetes mellitus, as well as novel strategies for increasing the source of beta cells (stem cells/xenotransplants) and blocking the immune response.

Were you unable to attend the IPITA World Congress in September or need a review of talks you might have missed? If so, attend this webinar for a meeting review, and get caught up on all of the highlights you need to know!

Dr. Peter Stock, IPITA 2013 Congress Chair, will provide a meeting summary highlighting the marked improvements in rates of insulin independence following both pancreastic islet and whole organ pancreas transplants for diabetes mellitus, as well as novel strategies for increasing the source of beta cells (stem cells/xenotransplants) and blocking the immune response.

April 21, 2015

Atul Humar, MD • University Health Network-University of Toronto
Camille Kotton, MDMassachusetts General Hospital
Raymund Razonable, MDMayo Clinic
Moderated by Shirish Huprikar, MD • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

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Read the Q&A that wasn't answered during webinar

Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

Dr. Kotton will describe the importance of prevention, and the various methods of preventing CMV, including; universal prophylaxis, preemptive therapy, and a hybrid approach, along with the merits and downfalls of each approach. Dr. Razonable will review the current recommendations for the treatment of cytomegalovirus infection and disease in transplant recipients, and discuss antiviral drugs in the pipeline that may be useful for the treatment of drug-resistant infections. Dr. Humar will explain how measurements of host immune response to CMV can be used to predict the risk of CMV reactivation in different settings, and how prevention and treatment strategies might be refined with the use of immune monitoring tools.

After participating in this webinar, the learner will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of CMV prevention, along with the various approaches used for optimal prevention
  2. Explain the standard treatment for CMV infection and disease in transplant recipients and discuss novel antiviral drugs
  3. Describe the potential for using immune monitoring tools to refine and improve prevention and treatment strategies

Dr. Kotton will describe the importance of prevention, and the various methods of preventing CMV, including; universal prophylaxis, preemptive therapy, and a hybrid approach, along with the merits and downfalls of each approach. Dr. Razonable will review the current recommendations for the treatment of cytomegalovirus infection and disease in transplant recipients, and discuss antiviral drugs in the pipeline that may be useful for the treatment of drug-resistant infections. Dr. Humar will explain how measurements of host immune response to CMV can be used to predict the risk of CMV reactivation in different settings, and how prevention and treatment strategies might be refined with the use of immune monitoring tools.

Objectives:

  • Discuss the importance of CMV prevention, along with the various approaches used for optimal prevention
  • Explain the standard treatment for CMV infection and disease in transplant recipients and discuss novel antiviral drugs
  • Describe the potential for using immune monitoring tools to refine and improve prevention and treatment strategies
October 23, 2013

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

What You'll Learn:

  1. Appreciate highlights of updated ID COP Guidelines published in 2013
  2. Appraise novel additions to ID COP Guidelines published in 2013
  3. Review Updated International Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Cytomegalovirus in Solid-Organ Transplantation

Click here to download additional questions that were answered offline by Dr. Camille Kotton. 

March 31, 2015

Peter Heeger, MD • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Moderated by Leonardo Riella, MD, PhD • Brigham and Women's Hospital

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

The goal of this webinar is to describe the available data on pre- and post-transplant immune monitoring and how incorporating specific tests may help us diagnose, predict, and better treat our transplant recipients.

After participating in this webinar, the learner will be able to:

  1. Summarize the current most promising and best tested urine and peripheral blood, molecular, and cellular assays available for risk assessment following transplantation
  2. Detail the utility, pitfalls and limitations of currently available assays
  3. Propose future directions and trial designs required to develop and validate immune monitoring tools for clinical use

The goal of this webinar is to describe the available data on pre- and post-transplant immune monitoring and how incorporating specific tests may help us diagnose, predict, and better treat our transplant recipients.

Objectives:

  • Summarize the current most promising and best tested urine and peripheral blood, molecular, and cellular assays available for risk assessment following transplantation
  • Detail the utility, pitfalls and limitations of currently available assays
  • Propose future directions and trial designs required to develop and validate immune monitoring tools for clinical use

 

October 16, 2013

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

What You'll Learn:

  1. Summarize the major features of the 2013 Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology, held from August 19-23 in Comandatuba, Brazil
  2. Review the findings of the current Banff Working Groups that were presented at the conference
  3. Present the newly revised Banff Classification for antibody-mediated rejection in renal allografts, including the rationale for the revisions and the process involved in reaching a consensus on these
  4. Introduce the three new Banff Working Groups that have been formed as a result of presentations and discussions at the conference

Click here to download additional questions that were answered offline by Dr. Mark Haas. 

March 17, 2015

Norah Terrault MD, MPH • University of California, San Francisco
Moderated by Robert Brown, MD, MPH • Columbia University Medical Center

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

The diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C has been considered a relative or absolute contraindication for non-liver transplantation in the past, due to concerns of liver disease progression post-transplantation and a lack of safe and effective therapies. The recent availability of interferon-free, all-oral, antiviral drug combinations to treat of chronic hepatitis C provides an opportunity to revise management algorithms to optimize the care of non-liver transplant candidates and recipients.

After participating in this webinar, the learner will be able to:

  1. Describe the components of the new HCV all-oral combinations, the role of ribavirin, and anticipated rates of HCV eradication with treatment
  2. Summarize the safety data of new HCV therapies as it pertains to non-liver transplant candidates and recipients, including key drug-drug interactions (HCV antivirals and immunosuppressive drugs)
  3. Evaluate the pros and cons of HCV treatment pre versus post-transplantation, including considerations related to use of anti-HCV positive donors

The diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C has been considered a relative or absolute contraindication for non-liver transplantation in the past, due to concerns of liver disease progression post-transplantation and a lack of safe and effective therapies. The recent availability of interferon-free, all-oral, antiviral drug combinations to treat of chronic hepatitis C provides an opportunity to revise management algorithms to optimize the care of non-liver transplant candidates and recipients.

 

Objectives:

  • Describe the components of the new HCV all-oral combinations, the role of ribavirin, and anticipated rates of HCV eradication with treatment
  • Summarize the safety data of new HCV therapies as it pertains to non-liver transplant candidates and recipients, including key drug-drug interactions (HCV antivirals and immunosuppressive drugs)
  • Evaluate the pros and cons of HCV treatment pre versus post-transplantation, including considerations related to use of anti-HCV positive donors
February 17, 2015

David Serur, MDNew York Presbyterian Weill Cornell
Elisa Gordon, PhD, MPHNorthwestern University
Catherine Garvey, RN, BA, CCTC • University of Minnesota Health

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Free to AST members: $25 fee is waived upon logging in during the checkout process.

The long-term acceptance of living donor transplantation has been based on a combination of excellent recipient outcomes and belief that in actuarial terms, there is no increased risk of living with one kidney. However, recent studies have raised controversy and concerns regarding the long-term risks of CKD in kidney donors. How do we interpret these findings? How do we evaluate and when do we clear donors with pre-existing medical conditions like hypertension, obesity, kidney stones, etc., and convey divergent opinions to patients? Comprehensive donor consent remains at the core of this process. Though perceived as challenging existing assumptions, the disclosure of new data will enable a better understanding of the risks so that potential living donors can make a more meaningful, informed decision.

After participating in this webinar, the learner will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between 'low risk donors' and medically complex living donors
  2. Evaluate the meanings of new studies regarding donor risk
  3. Refine the current informed consent process in light of the evolving data

The long-term acceptance of living donor transplantation has been based on a combination of excellent recipient outcomes and belief that in actuarial terms, there is no increased risk of living with one kidney. However, recent studies have raised controversy and concerns regarding the long-term risks of CKD in kidney donors. How do we interpret these findings? How do we evaluate and when do we clear donors with pre-existing medical conditions like hypertension, obesity, kidney stones, etc., and convey divergent opinions to patients? Comprehensive donor consent remains at the core of this process. Though perceived as challenging existing assumptions, the disclosure of new data will enable a better understanding of the risks so that potential living donors can make a more meaningful, informed decision.

 

Objectives:

  • Distinguish between “low risk donors” and medically complex living donors.
  • Evaluate the meanings of new studies regarding donor risk.
  • Refine the current informed consent process in light of the evolving data.

 

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